Week 4 & NEDA

Can’t believe I’m already a month into training for my 5th half marathon. So crazy. Last week I mentioned that I started a new strength training program and after only doing it for a week I can definitely tell it’s going to be a game changer. I feel like it’s already helped my running form and stamina, and it’s definitely helping my sleep because I am so exhausted after every workout. I’m not mad about it.

As of yesterday my 26th birthday is 2 months away and I’d like to lose 10-12 lbs before then. My eating habits have been getting significantly better over the last few weeks so I feel like everything is finally coming together. With my past though, the desire to lose weight can be a slippery slope….

I shared some of my story on Instagram (cpier10 if you want to follow) but last week was Eating Disorder Awareness Week, I felt like it was important to talk about this because ED’s are very common in athletes. While I have never been diagnosed with one, I have had anorexic/orthorexic tendencies from my teens through 22-23. I’ve never fully disclosed everything I put myself through during that time to anyone but my nutritionist and the guys I dated during that time. I think I’ll still keep some things to myself but I’m hoping that by opening up some, it helps others to feel like they’re not alone.

I’ve always struggled with my weight, I gained a lot of weight the summer before 4th grade because I wasn’t very active and I was constantly overeating. My body image issues started shortly after that. It wasn’t until I was in my sophomore year of high school that I really started “dieting”, and by dieting I mean eating maybe 500-800 calories a day. I started to lose some weight and I had allowed it to get to the point where I felt better when I didn’t eat. Of course this isn’t sustainable so I’d go through a couple of months of that followed by a couple of months of binge eating. This peaked when I was 19, I had gotten a gym membership and I quickly became obsessed with Spin, the elliptical, and  burning as many calories as possible. I would go to the gym, get on the elliptical for  an hour, go to an hour-long spin class, then go back home to get on the treadmill because I NEEDED to lose weight. It consumed me. During that time I was dating a guy who went to Pitt and I would visit him on the weekends, every weekend I would get so drunk because I was never eating enough and exercising too much. I used the alcohol to briefly forget that I didn’t like myself and to finally let loose. I was a hot mess.

I did this for a year until I decided to do my first half marathon for my 21st birthday, I ended up gaining back all of the weight but I did cut out alcohol for 5 months in order to take training more seriously. Once the race was over I started celebrating 21 and put on even more weight and drinking even more. I was so depressed that I would come home from work, close all the curtains and go right to sleep. By the time I was 22 I had put on so much weight I had reached a number on the scale I’d never seen before and was being told by my doctor that I had fatty liver. (Fatty liver can be caused by alcohol as well as gaining a lot of weight because the fat has to go somewhere) I immediately went back to my old habits of restricting calories, counting every single thing I ate, cutting out alcohol, and I started to see the number on the scale go down.

When I met my nutritionist a few months after the fatty liver diagnosis, I was still only eating 800-1000 calories a day. He made a meal plan for me and I started eating around 1300-1500 and the weight started to come off because for once I was finally eating the right amount of food. In all honesty, the fatty liver diagnosis was the wake up call I needed and looking back I’m glad that happened. I’ve been working with Andrew from Case Specific Nutrition for a little over 3 years now and we’ve been through a lot; several meal plans, a few whole 30s, setbacks, screw ups, but I’ve also learned a lot from him. My number one goal isn’t to be skinny anymore. It’s to live a balance life and to be strong, confident, comfortable, faster and HEALTHY.

Everyone has their own journey, and some don’t come out on top. I finally feel like I’ve got my head above water. I still struggle with these habits, but I see the goal and I’m getting there in a safe and healthy way. It’s a good feeling to have…

 

Till next time…

New year, new goals.

Oh hey there! I know, it’s been a while. Now that the holiday’s are over I’m starting to focus on another training cycle and my goals for 2018.

I know it’s kind of cliché, but I totally buy into the whole “New year, new me” thing. This year I have some pretty big goals for myself as far running goes. Last year my 3 big goals were to get RRCA certified, run a sub 3:00 half marathon time, and PR at the Chicago marathon. I guess two out of three isn’t too bad, but this year I’m going to see how much more I can push myself.

My biggest goal this year is to PR at the marathon distance this fall by an hour. Yes, an hour. The goal for the Chicago marathon was to run in 6:00 or less, obviously that didn’t happen because it took me 7:07. A sixty minute PR would put me at 5:57, and I’m going to be putting in the work to make that happen.

Another goal that’s really important to me is to PR again at the Pittsburgh half marathon this May. Last year I cut twenty (20!!!) minutes off my time, coming in at 2:56 and some change. The new goal for May 6 is 2:45, which means I’ll have to run 12:35 minute miles. Slightly terrifying but I know I can get it done. I’d also like to exceed my fundraising goal for the American Cancer Society, I’m once again dedicating a race to my Grandma Betty who has stage 4 colon cancer and just spent, what we think, her last Christmas with us. You can find the link to donate in my last post, if you can’t donate thoughts and prayers for my grandma are appreciated.

The last two would be to travel for races more, whether they’re only an hour away or across the country, and to acquire more athletes to train which is pretty self-explanatory. I’m currently registered for the Napa to Sonoma half marathon in July. I never imagined I’d be going to California to run but I’m really excited to get out and see new places through running. I’m still undecided about my fall marathon but I’m heavily leaning towards the Toronto marathon on October 21. You’ll also see me posting here more consistently, training starts in a few weeks so I’ll be taking you guys with me through that journey.

Because I care about things outside of running; some of my personal goals this year are to finally finish my associates in Business Management, continue to lose the 25-30lbs I’ve already started to get rid of, and to make myself a priority. Sometimes you have to put yourself first and this year I’m going to learn to do that.

 

What are your 2018 goals?

Training my first athlete

Happy Sunday everyone, can’t believe we’re almost half way through November. It’s been a pretty quiet week for me, trying to get back into a work out routine and really be mindful of what I’m eating because I’m so focused on being better next year.

I wanted to discuss coaching this week and what it’s been like to train my first “real” athlete. As I mentioned in one of my first posts, I got my RRCA certification earlier this year and I’m really passionate about helping others and becoming a resource for them even if they decide to not work with me. This past June my athlete reached out to me via email because he wanted to run a marathon this November, after asking several questions to see if we’d work well together and go over his goals we decided it was a good fit. I’ve trained myself for several races and I’ve helped out family/friends but never had an actual client so I knew I’d also be doing some learning.

It’s been an incredible learning experience over the last few months, I can honestly say it’s probably been the most fulfilling thing I’ve ever done. I’ve learned to give advice based on logic instead of emotion, which is something I usually struggle with because I am an emotional person, and I’ve also learned that I don’t know the answer to everything (shocker). Since working with him I’ve learned so much more about the sport because if he had a question I wanted to be able to answer it correctly. He crushed every work out I gave him, if he had a question he’d ask so he wouldn’t risk injuring himself, and most of all he’s inspired me to pursue running and coaching even more. By watching him never give up and grow as a person it’s inspired me to do the same. His marathon was yesterday and he did so well! I’m so proud of him and his accomplishment.

It’s definitely not easy getting into coaching as someone who isn’t as seasoned as others because you’re asking someone to trust that you know what you’re doing. I’m not going to lie I was nervous that I’d fail at this and I’m so happy it went well. I strongly encourage everyone to either work with a coach or at least seek their advice because they can offer so much insight and hold you accountable. On days when I wasn’t feeling it my coach would reach out to me and give me words of encouragement and just that little boost made all the difference, that’s something I tried to mimic with my athlete.

I’m hoping that I’ll have many more awesome clients next year and that I can make an impact in their lives as well. There is truly nothing more rewarding than helping someone achieve their goals.

 

Till next time..